DIM Weight Calculator

Your DIM: 0 Lbs.

Length: Width: Height: Weight:

What is DIM?

DIM, or dimensional weight, is based on the measurements of a package:
(L x W x H) / DIM divisor

The DIM divisor for 2022 is 139. When you send a package, your carrier will electronically scan it to determine its dimensions and calculate the DIM weight, rounding up to the next pound. If the DIM weight is higher than its actual weight, you’ll pay based on the DIM weight. This makes it absolutely vital to choose the right packaging.

ACTUAL WEIGHT

0 Lbs.

vs

DIMENSIONAL WEIGHT

0 Lbs.

ACTUAL WEIGHT
COST PER PACKAGE

$0.00

vs

DIMENSIONAL WEIGHT
COST PER PACKAGE

$0.00

*Based on published 2022 ground shipping prices

Results are based on the following inputs. Modify as needed to calculate DIM and its impact.

Insert your package dimensions to see how DIM is impacting you.

You’ll be charged the DIM weight, which is above your actual.
Adjust your package configurations if you can.
Your DIM weight is less than your actual weight.
In this case DIM is not a factor and you will pay for shipping based on the actual weight of your package.

If your package is longer than 48” on the longest side, longer than 30” on the second-longest side and/or more than 105” in length and girth combined, this fee is applied.
You’ll be charged the Additional Handling Weight Charge of $25.50.
If your actual weight is 51 lbs. or higher, this fee is applied.

Stay on
top of DIM.

Sifted can help you stay ahead of costly surprises, like DIM, with key insights to boost your bottom line. Utilize tools like Logistics Intelligence and box size modeling to start shipping smarter today.

Go Further: Learn More About Dimensional Weight (DIM)

What is dimensional weight?

Dimensional weight (also known as volumetric weight) is a calculation technique that major parcel carriers (FedEx, UPS, and USPS) use to calculate shipping fees based on the size of the package, rather than its actual weight.

In a nutshell, dimensional (DIM) weight measures exactly how much space your package takes up in relation to its actual weight.

Historically, major carriers charged shipping fees based on the physical weight of the package and the distance to the destination.

The problem with using only weight for cost calculation is that lightweight packages of large sizes, such as a box full of pillows, would be charged less but occupy more space in the warehouse and trucks. Carriers have to ship millions of packages around the world, with limited space in their warehouses and on their fleets of trains, planes, and trucks.

With dimensional weight pricing, it costs more to ship something light and large like a box of cotton than if you were to be charged based on its actual weight. Similarly, if you ship a smaller and denser item like a book, it will have a dimensional weight less than its actual weight, resulting in lower shipping charges compared to the lightweight, larger package.

When is dimensional weight pricing used?

Shipping companies use dimensional (DIM) weight to account for the difference in weight and size of packages.

The DIM weight approach enables carriers to charge customers for the space (volume) their package occupies. Otherwise, they’d struggle to turn a profit if they charged for a truck full of pillows based on only its physical weight.

The DIM pricing model discourages people from using oversized boxes that take up extra space in the warehouse and the delivery truck. Carriers have to use extra fillers like plastic foam and bubble wrap to stabilize the contents.

On the other hand, packing your shipments in exactly the right-size box means spending less on shipping.

If the actual weight of your package is higher than its DIM weight, carriers use the actual weight as the billable weight.

What is a DIM factor?

The DIM factor (also known as the DIM divisor) is a number set by shipping carriers to calculate the DIM weight of a package. Carriers use the DIM factor to set a base weight for 1 cubic foot (1,728 cubic inches) of space.

The parameters for calculating the DIM factor vary from carrier to carrier depending on the package’s size, weight, and destination. FedEx and USPS use DIM factors of 139. This number can also be negotiated and specific to a particular shipper, but the standard DIM factor is 139.

While the DIM weight formula has remained the same over the last few years, the DIM factor has undergone changes. For this reason, it is best to check with your carrier before making any deliveries.

How to calculate DIM weight

As the name suggests, this pricing model accounts for the dimensions (length, width, and height) of cargo to calculate the shipping charges. Shipping fees are calculated by multiplying the length, height, and width of the package and dividing the product by a DIM divisor (also referred to as a DIM factor).

The formula for calculating the DIM weight of a package is:

DIM weight = (length x width x height) / DIM divisor

NOTE that the DIM weight calculation applies to a package if its volume size (cubic size) is greater than 1 cubic foot (1,728 inches). Otherwise, the actual weight of the package is considered as its billable weight.

Dimensional weight calculator for FedEx

DIM weight for FedEx is calculated by multiplying the length by the width by the height and dividing the product by 139. Remember to round off each measurement to the nearest full inch.

For example, if you send a package that is 15” x 15” x 15”, and it weighs 20 pounds, the FedEx shipping rate will be calculated using the DIM pricing model as follows:

DIM weight = (l x w x h) / DIM factor
= 15” x 15” x 15” / 139
= 3,375 cubic inches / 139
DIM weight = 24.28 lbs

Because the DIM weight is 4.28 lbs heavier than the actual weight, it will be used as the billable weight.

The FedEx shipping calculator asks for additional details to calculate shipping costs. These are:

  • The origin and destination of the package (domestic or international shipments)
  • The number of packages you send
  • The size, weight, and dimensions of the package
  • The kind of packaging you use
  • The shipping date

A number of other factors may affect FedEx shipping charges such as the shape of the package, fuel costs, and special handling requirements.

Dimensional weight calculator for UPS

Here’s how you can calculate the DIMweight for UPS:

  1. Measure the length, width, and height of the package and round off each measurement to the nearest whole number.
  2. Next, calculate the cubic size (volume size) by multiplying the length by the width by the height.
  3. Finally, divide the volume size of your package by the DIM factor.

UPS uses a DIM factor of 139 for daily rates and 166 for retail rates. Let’s calculate DIM weight for UPS using the retail rate.

Suppose you send a package that is 15” x 12” x 15”, and weighs 20 pounds, the UPS shipping rate calculation using the DIM pricing model will look like this:

DIM weight = (l x w x h) / DIM factor
= 15” x 12” x 15” / 166
= 3,375 cubic inches / 166
DIM weight = 16.26 lbs

Here the DIM weight is 3.74lbs lighter than the actual weight, therefore the latter will be used as the billable weight.

The UPS shipping calculator asks for the following details to calculate shipping costs.

  • The origin and destination of your package
  • The weight and dimensions of the package
  • The shipping date
  • The shipping service you use (eg. ground service, priority mail)
  • Delivery surcharges on packages picked from or delivered to remote areas
  • Taxes and additional fees

Factors such as the shape of the package also affect the UPS shipping price.

Dimensional weight calculator for USPS

Determine the cubic size of the package by multiplying its length by the width by the height. Divide the product the carrier’s DIM divisor to calculate the DIM weight. The USPS DIM divisor is 166.

Let’s say you send a package that is 15” x 12” x 12”, and weighs 10 pounds. Here’s what the calculation for USPS shipping rate will look like:

DIM weight = (l x w x h) / DIM factor
= 15” x 12” x 12” / 166
= 2,160 cubic inches / 166
DIM weight = 13.01 lbs

Because the DIM weight is heavier than the actual weight, the DIM weight will be used as the billable weight.

There are a number of factors that affect the USPS shipping rate calculation. These include:

  • The origin and destination of the package
  • The weight and dimensions of the package
  • The shipping date and time
  • The shipping service you use (eg. ground service)